I demand that you care what I had for lunch!

On August 7, 2012 by Eden M. Kennedy

Last week Jack and Jackson went on their annual camping trip to Big Sur, so I took the opportunity to lie in bed and stare at the ceiling and figure out what to do next with my life. Meditating like this doesn’t normally produce results for me beyond maybe an angry nap, but for once I tried to be honest with myself. I was inspired by a meditation teacher I recently read an interview with. The full interview is here, but the money quote is here:

Safransky: What’s the single most important piece of advice you would give to someone who wants to awaken?

Adyashanti: Get in touch with what you really want. What does awakening mean for you? Do you want it because it sounds good? Then you’ve borrowed someone else’s idea of it. What is it that’s intrinsic to you? What’s been important to you your whole life? If you touch upon that, you are in touch with a force that no teacher or teaching could ever give you. You are quite on your own in finding it. No one can tell you what that is. Once you feel it, once you’re clear on it, everything else will unfold from there. If you need a teacher, you’ll find one. If you need a teaching, you’ll bump into it, probably in the most unexpected way.

For me, I realized that I needed to start small and work from a really simple place and then see what happens. I wanted to step outside the boundaries of writing/blogging for awhile, so the next day during my lunch hour I charged up my point-and-shoot and made a little video. It’s sloppy and it’s 4:00 long, which is about twice the average amount of time most people spend on this site, so I’m begging your indulgence.

Lunch with the Letter B from Eden M. Kennedy on Vimeo.

(Here’s the link to the video clip I use when I’m talking about the polygraph test for plants.)

(Also, in the video I say “paganist” but what I really mean is “animist.” And the fact that I talk all that time without tying everything up in a meaningful conclusion is the result of my freewheeling, unscripted narrative me needing to shut up and eat and then get back to work.)

Comments

comments

33 Responses to “I demand that you care what I had for lunch!”

  • Love this.
    I want more.

  • Awww I would definately have lunch with you…but no wheat!

  • Yes, more of this.

    Also, I JUST said something in response to a questionnaire about the plant thing. Your saying it too makes me feel incredibly smart.

    K.

  • I agree, more of these.

  • Yes! Loved loved loved. I’m an animist, a shamanic practitioner and an omnivore. A lot of my moral conflict is removed by the fact that my body can’t metabolize non-heme iron, but yeah. I am with you on the plant thing.

  • I can’t believe you ate a bulldog for lunch.

    My dad used to have a video tape (yes, it was a long time ago) of satire skits by a cowboy named Baxter Black. In one of them, he “butchers” a bunch of plants to make his salad. I believe he’s making fun of people who don’t eat meat, but maybe the researcher with the plant electrodes would like to have a serious chat with him!

    Love the video. Love your blog. Keep up the good work!

  • I was just noticing yesterday that you hadn’t popped up in my feedreader in a while. So glad to hear from you again. And literally, this time. Loved this. More, please?

  • Most people consider that experiment that was recreated on the Secret Life of Plants as pseudoscientific. It certainly packed a punch, though! Everyone who saw it remembers it.

    This video reminded me of a time when I overheard someone in a cafe saying that she was only going to eat blue food. This was before the popularity of blue corn chips. I felt bad for her.

  • bulldog!

    you have a great voice, so i look forward to future videos…and tomorrows lunch of catfish and cucumbers.

    i am trying to make very simple yoga (i find it heavy and learned, to be honest) a part of my life due to my ailing lumbar facet joints. also, trying life without makeup, other than a quick flick of mascara on top lashes. searching for healthy, clean and fast, i guess. searching.

  • I wish for you an utterly deep and profound connection with all the different kinds of art that you wish to make, just an outpouring of satisfying creativity.
    Which looks sort of weird when I write it down here, but nonetheless is exactly what I thought when I was reading your post.

  • yeah… i heard about this phenomenon, i think? except it was that if you are pulling up a line of carrots, then ones in the ground have a reaction to the ones you are pulling, yes? the “carrots scream” thing. what are they screaming? “hey, you down the line….run!!!” ?? i’m not sure. hmm.

    i don’t even know what my CAT is thinking, but i’m pretty sure he’s thinking something. so carrots and whatnot? i dunno.

    i was a vegetarian for a loooooong time. but i still ate eggs and i reckon the chickens what laid em’ sometimes had a bit to scream about. now i’m an omnivore, but i only eat things that (as far as i know) had a good life and died in a humane fashion. maybe it’s bullshit, but i feel better this way than i did back then.

    that video was great, though. i love your posts, their quirkiness and honesty. thanks, as always. :)

  • I like the direction your path is taking. Please make more of these clever ‘shorts’. The way your thoughts wind around your message… such a natural vibe, and a great voice.

  • Hmm. Maggie Mason will have to revise her book. Everyone cares what you had for lunch!

  • This is so fun. I vote more!

  • That was a VERY good-looking lunch. Really appreciated the video, and also the quote you shared.
    Re: “What is it that’s intrinsic to you? What’s been important to you your whole life? If you touch upon that, you are in touch with a force that no teacher or teaching could ever give you”…
    I have a name for that force that makes us whole, the thing we get in touch with when we ask ourselves what’s important. It’s called our emotions!
    Emotions are underrated. As a culture, we treat them like lame cousins to the intellect, unwanted guests at the party of spirituality — thinking if we ignore them, maybe they’ll go away.
    But as human beings, our experience in that indescribable moment of being in touch with ourselves is not a thought but a feeling.
    Spiritual beings have a human experience through emotions. Get in touch with them and touch the force no teacher can give you.
    Thanks again for this lovely post!

  • Please more videos!

  • I had no idea that lunch could be so philosophical, but I liked finding out.

  • so enjoyable.

  • This was fantastic. I usually skip over any and all video content on blogs, but I watched this because I love you, and it was totally worth the four minutes. Maybe it’s because I’ve been thinking a lot about my own path and where to go next, but I just really enjoyed this post.

  • I love you so much.

    I read a really interesting article about bread in the latest issue of Whole Living. Bread that’s been made with out yeast and allowed to ferment on its own (flour and water) for a long time doesn’t seem to cause all the gluten related problems because the natural microbes of the flour breaks down the gluten. It also said a bunch of other sciencey stuff that you’d think as a scientist I’d remember, but I don’t. Any way…yes to this. Yes to a weekly podcast from you.

  • UP WITH BREAD!!! Bread is awesome, and on it’s behalf, I am deeply offended by this video. Also, there is a pretty cool Roald Dahl story about plants/trees that scream when cut–and some guy who is the only one who can hear them. Regardless, BREAD ROCKS!

  • I loved the video. Eden, you have a delightful way with words – no matter the media.
    Are you familiar with the Arrogant Worms? They created what must be the first pro-veggie protest song:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmK0bZl4ILM

  • I loved your video! I hope I am as funny and good-looking as you someday :) I read an article yesterday about a sourdough bread that even gluten-intolerant people can eat – maybe you could take a trip to Santa Monica and try some! I wish I lived closer and I’d go too: http://www.cheeseslave.com/top-10-reasons-to-eat-real-sourdough-bread-even-if-youre-gluten-intolerant/ Hope you have a fun & rejuvenating week to yourself!

  • This was super!! More please.

    I agonize over eating meat. I stop then start then stop. I cannot justify it in any way except…Well, no. Forget it. I can’t justify it.

    I have terrible problems with wheat and bread. And it is strange that some people get upset if there are foods you don’t want to eat even though they make you sick? I have even had people get angry about it! Do you run into that? I totally get it why someone would be upset about meat eating. But wheat! Why do they care! Do they care about the little wheats?

  • Wait, you didn’t eat the bulldog, right? Hey, you’re the one who started with the B thing.

    But in all seriousness (ok, maybe not all, but some) I can absolutely relate to the vague sense of guilt induced by consuming meat. I feel that, and have struggled with it, but I just don’t thrive as a vegetarian. I am severely intolerant to dairy (not just lactose, which everyone seems to be is the culprit, but more often than not isn’t) and I cannot tolerate more than occasional use of soy. What I’m trying to do is decrease the amount of animal foods I consume to 3-4 small portions a week, mostly in the evening because that’s when I need a heartier meal.

    How did you B-food day go?

  • Thank you for posting the link to the interview. I really appreciate it and this website.

  • Re: bloating and feeling ill after eating bread, you may want to be tested to see if you have celiac disease or a gluten intolerance since those are typical symptoms. Enjoyed the video!

  • I loved this video. You seem so grounded. More please!

  • This was great!

    Among lots of other things you’ve reminded me that I want to carve out time for a regular practice again.

  • I’ve been niggling, something inside of me is pushing me, to do this very same thing, too.

    We all need to do this: it’s how we can see some of the brilliance we hold onto for ourselves.

    I loved this.

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